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Review of the legal definition of involuntary manslaughter

On Behalf of | Mar 14, 2022 | Criminal Defense

The legal system has many criminal charges that it can seek to hold someone accountable for the death of another person. However, these charges usually depend on how the person died and the circumstances surrounding the reason for the person’s demise. The following information provides greater details about the charge of involuntary manslaughter and what its legal definition entails.

How the law sees involuntary manslaughter

Involuntary manslaughter is a criminal charge for the killing of a person. This charge, which can have different names in some states, such as criminally negligent homicide, is usually pursued by the legal system if the person’s death was unintentional.

Often, involuntary manslaughter occurs due to an accident such as during a traffic violation or a heat-of-the-moment argument. Due to its accidental or unintended nature, the law views this type of death differently than a murder charge. As such, the penalties for a conviction are less harsh than a typical murder charge.

The serious nature of involuntary manslaughter

One important aspect of understanding involuntary manslaughter is that it is a serious charge. It is considered a felony in most states. While it may not be punishable by a significant amount of time spent in jail in comparison to a murder charge, individuals who’ve been accused must take the matter seriously.

Defendants should know that if they’re charged and convicted, it is possible to spend up to 10 years or more in prison. It is critical for defendants to know rights to mount a good criminal defense against the charges.

Involuntary manslaughter stems from an accidental death but can still result in severe penalties like jail time. If you’ve been charged with involuntary manslaughter, knowing its definition, how the charge applies and your rights will help to ensure that you can protect yourself in the event of criminal prosecution.